MSc in Computer Science (Negotiated Learning)

Due to intense competition for places on the MSc NL programme, along with unprecedented growth in international applications, no further places will be allocated for non EU applications for September 2018 intake. Applications that are submitted after 7th February will not be reviewed. Please be advised that a waitlist will not operate.

Applications for September 2019 entry will open in October 2018.
7th February 2018


 

Why study the MSc in Computer Science (Negotiated Learning) in UCD?

The Taught Masters Programme in Computer Science by Negotiated Learning is a flexible, innovative programme which builds on the established portfolio of CS graduate taught courses but is customised to individual student needs and their prior learning experiences

The Taught Masters in Computer Science by Negotiated Learning is a flexible programme that draws on a rich and varied portfolio of subjects and classes to allow students to work towards a highly personalised degree that is tailored to their individual goals and prior experience. This is a degree for students who already have a strong background in computer science, either through an undergraduate computer science degree, or a related degree together with industry experience. It furnishes both intellectual and professional development, and can be taken on a full-time or a part time basis.

Within this programme, students are not presented with a fixed curriculum. Rather, they select from a large reservoir of modules provided by several schools. These modules are loosely organised into thematic streams, and students are free to select modules within or across streams. As well as modules from the UCD School of Computer Science, modules are contributed from the UCD School of Business, UCD School of Physics, UCD School of Information & Library Studies, and The NovaUCD Innovation and Technology Transfer Centre. Students enrolling in this MSc are also provided with the opportunity to work on a specialised research task and/or work as part of a research group as part of this programme.

At the start of the academic year, each incoming student has a Student Needs Advising session with a staff member, at which the student's prior expertise and current intellectual and career goals are assessed, and guidance is given in module selection.

Most modules on this page are grouped into thematic streams. There are five such streams: Data Science, Enterprise Cloud Computing, Software Engineering, Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science. There are, in addition, many modules listed under "miscellaneous" that do not comfortably fit into this loose thematic grouping.

We present modules organised into thematic streams in order to assist students and advisors in module selection. There is no requirement that students pick modules only within a stream, and there is no objection at all to picking modules from several streams and mixing them freely with the miscellaneous modules.

In the Data Science stream and the Enterprise Cloud Computing stream, there is an additional opportunity. Students who select all of the modules labelled "core" within these streams will be awarded an additional Diploma Supplement in addition to their master's degree. This supplement is a certification that a coherent group of modules in the specific field of Data Science or of Enterprise Cloud Computing were completed. Diploma supplements are not available for any other module combinations.

The M.Sc. consists of 90 credits: 60 credits obtained through classes (modules) and a thesis/team software project/internship worth 30 credits. A broad set of module offerings are provided, drawn from several schools within UCD. A provisional list of modules is available here.

Incoming students will discuss and agree their module choices with an advisor at their Student Needs Advising session before the start of Semester 1. Incoming students must therefore be on the UCD campus one week before lectures begin, in time for induction day (September 5, 2016).

Modules are grouped into thematic streams, and ordered by semester. This is to help you in selecting a coherent group of modules. You do not have to choose all modules within one stream. Many modules do not belong to any stream, and some may be listed in more than one stream. They are grouped into a "miscellaneous" stream. Please note carefully: you do not have to select your modules from within one stream only. You are free to combine modules from any number of streams, and those outside of the streams altogether.  Streams serve to group thematically realted modules together to assist you in designing your negotiated learning programme.

Induction Day - September 2018

Induction day will be held on Monday 3rd September 2018. It is mandatory for all first year full-time and part-time students to attend. Second year students can choose to attend, as they attend induction day in their first year. 

Induction day is held in the School of Computer Science and registration is from 9:00-9:30am and the day will end around 5pm. All presentations are available online in moodle for students after induction day.  
 

Induction Day Schedule, Monday 4th September 2017

 

Important Links

Term dates - 2016/17 until 2018/19

Draft timetable NL programme 2017/18

 

Student Needs Assessment (SNA)

At the start of the academic year, each incoming student has a Student Needs Advising (SNA) session with an academic member of staff, at which the student's prior expertise and current intellectual and career goals are assessed, and guidance is given in module selection. Incoming students should review the modules listed in the streams section, check to see that they are eligible to take the module and list the modules that they are interested in taking prior to their SNA session.

Modules can be taken from within a stream or across a number of different streams, as long as there are no timetable clashes. Occasionally modules are withdrawn if insufficient students are registered to the module;  students will be advised by email if this occurs.

Full-time students register for 60 taught credits, ideally 30 taught credits per semester.
Part-time students register for 30 taught credits per year, ideally 15 taught credits per semester.

All students a minimum of 40 credits need to be at level 4.

SNA sessions will be held on Tuesday 5th, Wednesday 6th and Thursday 7th September and students will be emailed to let them know when they can book their SNA session.

Module search 2017/18 academic year  (tick show modules from level 3 box for COMP3XXXX modules, tick show modules from level 4 box for COMP4XXXX modules)

 

Enterprise Cloud Computing - Core modules

Modules on this stream are hosted and run by the IPA at 57-61 Lansdowne Road, Dublin 4. These modules typically run from 6:15-8:30pm

IPA timetable 2017/18

Semester 1
​COMP41530 Web Services in Cloud Computing - Thursday evening
COMP47400  Network and Storage - Tuesday evening
COMP41500  Virtualisation and Cloud Computing - Monday evening

Semester 2​
COMP47610  Tools and Security - Monday evening
COMP47620  Management Compliance - Thursday evening

 

Module Registration

Please disregard emails from central UCD giving a module registration time. All MSc Computer Science Negotiated Learning students must have their SNA during induction week, and module registration will occur following this.

Student do not register for their modules, this is processed in the Graduate Taught Programme Office during induction week.

 

 

Students complete a 30 credit research project. This requirement can be met in three ways.

Most students will take part in Team Software Development Project that runs from the end of May to the middle of August. Within this project, students will learn to work together towards a concrete project goal, including requirements specification and negotiation with stakeholders, prototyping, applying a variety of technologies and methodologies, evaluation, demonstration and presentation. Most project teams will use a combination of Django and Python in development. Typically, there will be one contact session per week.

Some students will earn their 30 credits through an industrial internship. A limited number of internships with large industrial partners will be advertised, and places will be awarded based on competitive applications. Some internships can be expected to be extended beyond the three months required for the Negotiated Learning programme.

Some students will design and execute stand-alone projects under the supervision of individual members of staff. This option is not available to all students, because of the heavy supervision demands. Arrangements for one-on-one supervision must be made by the student and must have the agreement of the supervisor.

Further information on all three options will be given during Induction Day, on September 05, 2016.

The degree programme can be completed on a full time basis in 12 months, or it can be spread over two years on a part-time basis. Part time students take approximately half as many modules as full time students each semester. Most part-time students will complete their research project in the Summer of their second year.

While the programme offers some modules with evening classes, and some modules that are mainly taught online, these options are limited, and it is not normally possible to complete this degree without substantial regular attendance at day time lectures and practicals on campus in UCD.

APPLICATIONS WILL REMAIN OPEN FOR SEPTEMBER 2018 INTAKE UNTIL PLACES HAVE BEEN FILLED.  AFTER THIS TIME THERE MAY BE A RESERVE LIST CREATED.
DETAILS WILL BE UPDATED HERE

21st November 2017

Entry Requirements:

· A minimum 2.1, second-class honours degree in computer science or related area. or

· An honours Higher Diploma in Computer Science or ICT. or

· A primary degree with a minimum of three years' work experience in a computer science specialist area.

 

Where appropriate you will also need:

· High academic grades (your transcript should include grades for each subject taken)

· Names and contact details of two referees who can assess your intellectual ability, programming ability, maturity and motivation

 

If English is not your native language, unless you have done your primary degree through English in an English speaking country, an English language qualification is required for all programmes.

UCD English Language requirements

 

Application Procedure:

Interested applicants must register their application to the programme through the UCD Online Graduate Applications System. Be aware that a small processing fee will apply.

 

Please be careful to apply to the correct programme. The full-time and part-time programme options are listed as:

- MSc in Computer Science (Neg) FT T150

- MSc in Computer Science (Neg) PT T151

 

Only fully-complete online applications will be considered by the review board following each round. Applications that are deemed to be incomplete will be labelled as such and carried forward to the subsequent review round (assuming places still remain) when the candidate is expected to have provided any outstanding information.

 

Only complete applications will be considered. These should consist of:

Online application

• A 1 page statement of interest that clearly lists what you would like to achieve from the programme and provide examples of the modules that are of interest to you.

• A 2-page professional CV (including details of any prior industrial experience).

• Two completed referee forms (see below).

• Copies of any relevant transcripts (originals will need to be provided at a later date for successful applications).

• A copy of the ID page of your passport or birth certificate (foreign applicants only).

• Evidence of English language proficiency as set out below (foreign applicants only).

Required Paperwork & Resources

1 Referee Form (wordpdf)

English Language Requirements

Admission is subject ultimately to UCD Graduate School Board approval.

Programme Directors

Dr Fred Cummins & Dr Rem Collier
UCD School of Computer Science,
University College Dublin,
Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland

Programme Manager

Ms Rosemary Deevy 
Programme Manager, MSc Negotiated Masters Programme,
UCD School of Computer Science,
University College Dublin,
Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
Email: rosemary.deevy@ucd.ie

What is the duration of the MSc Computer Science NL programme?

The MSc Computer Science (NL) programme can be taken on a full-time (T150) basis over one year, or a part-time basis (T151) over two years.

The programme commences September each year - there is no spring intake.

Who can apply to the NL programme?

You must meet the entry requirements –

· A minimum 2.1, second-class honours degree in computer science or related area or

· An honours Higher Diploma in Computer Science or ICT or

· A primary degree with a minimum of three years' work experience in a computer science specialist area

Students are expected to be proficient in programming - object orientated & procedural programming for example - there are no provisions made for students who demonstrate poor performance due to inadequate programming capability.

How many credits must be taken on the NL programme?

Students must take a total of 90 credits – 60 taught credits with the remaining 30 credits made up of team software project/internship/dissertation.

What modules can I study?

Currently there are more than 90 module options offered in conjunction with the UCD Schools of Business, Physics, Information & Library Studies, Mathematical Sciences, Philosophy, Psychology, and Law.

Incoming students will discuss and agree their module choices with an advisor at their Student Needs Advising session before the start of Semester 1. Incoming students must therefore be on the UCD campus one week before lectures begin, in time for induction day (5th September 2016).

Modules are grouped into thematic streams, and ordered by semester. This is to help you in selecting a coherent group of modules. You do not have to choose all modules within one stream. Many modules do not belong to any stream, and some may be listed in more than one stream. They are grouped into a "miscellaneous" stream.

What are the streams that are currently available for 2016/17 academic year?

• Data Science

• Cloud and Distributed Computing

• Software Engineering and Distributed Computing

• Internet of Things

• Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science

What are the three options for the 30 credit module?

Most students will take part in Team Software Development Project that runs from the end of May to the middle of August. Within this project, students will learn to work together towards a concrete project goal, including requirements specification and negotiation with stakeholders, prototyping, applying a variety of technologies and methodologies, evaluation, demonstration and presentation. Most project teams will use a combination of Django and Python in development. Typically, there will be one contact session per week.

Some students will earn their 30 credits through an industrial internship. A limited number of internships with large industrial partners will be advertised, and places will be awarded based on competitive applications. Some internships can be expected to be extended beyond the three months required for the Negotiated Learning programme.

Some students will design and execute stand-alone projects (dissertation) under the supervision of individual members of staff. This option is not available to all students, because of the heavy supervision demands. Arrangements for one-on-one supervision must be made by the student and must have the agreement of the supervisor.

Further information on all three options will be given during Induction Day.

Part-time students on the NL programme will take either the team software project or the dissertation module.

How many modules do I take each semester?

The academic year is divided into three semesters, semester 1 runs from September to December, semester 2 runs from January to May and semester 3 runs from May to end August. Full-time students ideally take 30 taught credits per semester, though this may vary slightly based on the modules chosen.

Part-time students, taking the NL programme over two years, take 15 taught credits per semester. The 30 credit module can be taken in semester 3 of year 1 or year 2.

When do students graduate from the NL programme?

Graduations take place each December. Further details available on the Conferring Unit website

When are applications open to apply for the NL programme?

Applications open late October/early November for entry onto the programme the following September. Applications generally close early June for non-EU students.

What are the fees for the NL programme?

Details of programme fees, when fees are billed, how to pay, frequently asked questions and more –

Web: UCD Fees 

Full-time NL programme – T150 Part-time NL programme – T151

What scholarships are available for applicants to the NL programme?

UCD offers a number of postgraduate scholarships for full-time, self-funding international students, holding an offer of a place on masters programmes. Please visit Scholarships and Funding for further information.

What accommodation is available for students?

UCD has accommodation for over 2,500 students across five locations. Places are limited and more information is available at  UCD Residences.  For information and advice on living off campus, please contact the UCD Residences Off-Campus Office or the UCD Student Union Accommodation Services. Please visit Accommodation Booking & Support Office for further details.

 

What is the application procedure?

Interested applicants must register their application to the programme through the UCD Online Graduate Applications System. Be aware that a small processing fee will apply.

Please be careful to apply to the correct programme. The full-time and part-time programme options are listed as:

- MSc in Computer Science (Neg) FT T150

- MSc in Computer Science (Neg) PT T151

Only fully-complete online applications will be considered by the review board following each round. Applications that are deemed to be incomplete will be labelled as such and carried forward to the subsequent review round (assuming places still remain) when the candidate is expected to have provided any outstanding information.

Only complete applications will be considered. These should consist of:

Online application

• A 1 page statement of interest that clearly lists what you would like to achieve from the programme and provide examples of the modules that are of interest to you.

• A 2-page professional CV (including details of any prior industrial experience).

• Two completed referee forms (see below).

• Copies of any relevant transcripts (originals will need to be provided at a later date for successful applications).

• A copy of the ID page of your passport or birth certificate (foreign applicants only).

• Evidence of English language proficiency as set out below (foreign applicants only).

Required Paperwork & Resources

1 Referee Form (wordpdf)

English Language Requirements

Admission is subject ultimately to UCD Graduate School Board approval.